Special Technologies and Services
Electroneurodiagnostic Technologist

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Salary: $29,203 - $73,495
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Hourly: $10.48 - $27.26
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Outlook: 3 Stars
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Length of Training: 2 years
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An electroneurodiagnostic technologist, also known as electroencephalographic technologist, uses an electro encephalographic (EEG) machine to record the electrical activity of the brain and nervous system. They also use evoked potential (EP), polysomnography (PSG), and other hightech equipment to record the measurements taken from the central nervous system. Physicians use the information collected to diagnose brain diseases such as epilepsy, brain tumors, and strokes. They also use these results to evaluate the effects of head trauma and infectious diseases, as well as indicate any abnormal brain functions, and to pinpoint areas of the brain involved in a disease process.

Areas of Specialization

END technologists who specialize in or administer sleep disorder studies are called polysomnographic technologists. END technologists may also specialize in invasive and noninvasive cardiology technology.

Work Environment

Electroneurodiagnostic and electroencephalographic technologists may work in neurology departments at hospitals, clinics, physician offices, laboratories, medical centers, psychiatric facilities, and HMO’s. With experience, they may conduct research or become members of highly specialized neurosurgical teams. END and EEG technologists obtain and review medical histories, attach electrodes to the patient’s scalp and body, observe and document a patient’s clinical condition, communicate with friends/family of the patient and other healthcare personnel, and prepare detailed written reports for the acting physician. They may manage an electroneurodiagnostic laboratory, arrange work schedules, keep records, schedule appointments, order supplies, provide instruction to less experienced technologists, and assume responsibility for the upkeep of equipment.