Public Health
Environmental Health Specialist

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Salary: $43,665 - $79,039
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Hourly: $18.4 - $25.96
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Outlook: 4 Stars
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Length of Training: 2-6 years
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Career Explorer
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Roadmap
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Environmental Health Specialists protect, preserve and improve the well-being of the environment and human health by supervising and regulating programs that have an impact on public health. They must be familiar with current government and industry regulations. One objective of an environmental health specialist is to increase the delivery of comprehensive health services through the activities of the General Sanitation Division, Product Safety Division, and the Toxic Substances Control Division of the Texas Department of Health. They also enforce health and safety standards, collect and analyze samples, inspect recreational areas, nursing homes, schools, food service facilities, childcare facilities, and foster homes–as well as other community and public locations.

Areas of Specialization
Environmental Health Specialists have numerous specialty areas including air quality/pollution, water quality/pollution, toxicology, occupational health, solid and hazardous waste, food, safety, construction, milk and dairy production, pesticide management, and wildlife health/management.

Work Environment

Environmental Health Specialists work in a variety of settings, including state, county, and local health departments, wildlife parks, hospitals, private businesses, modern homes and offices, industrial plants, and private non-profit organizations. Applicants considering this job should consider exposure to hazardous settings.