Nursing
Licensed Vocational Nurse

Overview Preparation Resources blank graphic
Career photo
Salary: $41,494 - $44,694
small linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall line
Hourly: $14.94 - $21.89
small linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall line
Outlook: 3 Stars
small linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall line
Length of Training: 1 year
small linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall line
Professionals in the field
small linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall line
Career Explorer
small linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall line
Roadmap
small linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall linesmall line

Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVNs) help care for ill or injured people and perform health maintenance duties under the direction of physicians, dentists and registered nurses. In some states an LVN may be referred to as a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN). Most LVNs provide basic bedside care to patients such as taking vital signs, applying dressings, helping patients with bathing and personal hygiene, and administering prescribed medications. LVNs observe and report on patients’ symptoms, reaction to treatment and medication, and progress. They also help with the feeding and hygiene needs of the patient, work to keep them as comfortable as possible, and answer questions for the patient and their family. Some LVNs help registered nurses care for seriously ill patients in intensive care units and assist in the delivery and care of infants. LVNs may supervise nursing assistants or aides. They may also be responsible for some documentation of patient care and clerical work..

Work Environment

Licensed vocational nurses can work in hospitals, long-term care facilities, schools, doctors’ offices, private homes, businesses and health departments. They generally work 40-hour weeks, including weekends, nights and holidays. The work demands that they be on their feet most of the time and requires bending, stooping, lifting and walking. They work as part of the healthcare team caring for the patient.