Mortuary Science
Embalmer

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Salary: $23,872 - $37,212
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Hourly: $13.46 - $20.36
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Outlook: 3 Stars
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Length of Training: 2 years
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An embalmer is responsible for the physical preparation of human remains. This career is for individuals who are comfortable dealing with death and the human body.

Embalming is a sanitary, cosmetic and preservative process of preparing the body for burial. When embalming the body, the professional washes the body with a germicidal soap and replaces the blood with embalming fluid to preserve the tissues. They may reshape bodies and also apply cosmetics to provide a more natural appearance before placing the body in a casket.

Professionals in this field have the option to work as an embalmer or as a funeral director, or may be trained to do both.

Work Environment
Funeral service personnel may be self-employed or employed by funeral businesses, the military, hospitals, educational institutions or professional associations. Because death can occur at any time, working hours vary and can be long.

Areas of Specialization
Individuals may be licensed as funeral directors, embalmers or both. Funeral directors deal with funeral service management, burial preparation – except for embalming – and disposition of human bodies. Embalmers disinfect and preserve the body for the internment.