Medical Imaging
Radiologic Technologist

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Salary: $37,507 - $58,920
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Hourly: $18.41 - $28.66
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Outlook: 3 Stars
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Length of Training: 1-4 years
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Radiologic Technologists (RTs) use x-ray equipment to obtain the images used by physicians in diagnosing medical problems in patients. They prepare patients for radiologic examinations by explaining the procedure and positioning the patient so that the appropriate body part can be radiographed. RTs may also be trained to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which uses strong magnets and radio waves to get detailed images for diagnostic purposes.

Additionally, RTs may be trained to use computerized tomography (or CT scans), which is another imaging technology used for diagnostic purposes.

They work under the supervision of a physician, and must maintain the equipment and keep accurate records for patient medical files. RTs are also responsible for following strict protocols for protection against harmful radiation and patient care while present in the x-ray department.

Areas of Specialization

Radiologic Technologists tend to be generalists, but may specialize in certain populations including children or the elderly. A radiographer can also specialize in imaging areas, such as trauma radiography, interventional radiography, orthopedic radiography, surgical radiography, etc.

There are additional training programs for specialization in Computer Tomography, Mammography/Breast Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and Vascular Intervention.

Work Environment

Most Radiologic Technologists work in hospitals, but increasing numbers are working in specialized diagnostic imaging centers and for physicians’ practices. Some work in clinics and mobile radiography units. Radiation Technologists usually work 40-hour weeks, but this may involve evening and weekend shifts, particularly if working for a hospital.