Dietetics and Nutrition
Dietitian

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Salary: $35,533 - $54,843
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Hourly: $17.14 - $29.21
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Outlook: 2 Stars
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Length of Training: 4-6 years
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Professionals in the field
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Roadmap
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Registered dietitians (RD) assess the nutritional needs of both sick and healthy people to develop and implement nutrition programs based on individual needs. Dietitians work as clinicians, administrators, educators, researchers, and private practitioners in a variety of settings.

Note: A profession closely associated with dietitian is that of nutritionist; they each educate the public on the role healthy eating habits play in the promotion of wellness and prevention of disease. However, the title “nutritionist” is a less regulated title and someone using this title typically has fewer credentials than a Registered Dietitian.

Areas of Specialization

Dietitians may work in one of the following four specialty careers: management, clinical/therapeutic, community, and research.


Work Environment

Dietitians may be employed in hospitals, government settings, schools, daycare centers, nursing homes, company cafeterias, health maintenance organizations (HMOs), health clubs, food companies, research laboratories, public health clinics, and private practices.

Advancement
Those with advanced degrees may become teachers, researchers, and managers. With experience and advanced knowledge, diettians may work in specialty areas such as pediatrics, nutrition support, kidney disease, sports medicine, and gerontological nutrition. As the dietitian advances their management skills, he or she may advance from assistant to associate and then to director of a dietetic department.